Hypnosis and Hypnotherapy

helping to remove the limiting beliefs, habits and phobias


What is Hypnosis and Hypnotherapy?

Hypnosis is not a psychotherapeutic treatment, but a procedure that helps facilitate various types of therapies.

Hypnotherapy is a combination of traditional hypnosis with suggestions, imagery and other cognitive, behavioural (CBT), mindfulness, acceptance and NLP techniques to help the client in achieving their goals. It is a solutions based approach helping the clients to develop a growth mindset.

Hypnotherapy aids to treatHypnotherapy aids to improve
ANXIETYSELF ESTEEM
FEARSCONFIDENCE
PHOBIASCOMMUNICATION
PANIC ATTACKSRELATIONSHIPS
IBSBELIEFS
BAD HABITSPAIN MANAGEMENT
AVOIDANCESELF EFFICACY
INSOMNIASLEEP
Conditions for a hypnotherapy treatment

Several studies conducted by Gruzelier (2002) have shown that hypnosis and guided relaxation cause a significant modulation of the immune response, increasing the number of CD4-positive T cells while buffering the drop in natural killer (NK) and CD8 cells that occur in humans experiencing stress.

A typical hypnotherapy session consists of:

  1. Discussion of the client’s difficulties, agreement on treatment goals and plans.

  2. Induction and deepening of the hypnosis.

  3. Therapeutic interventions (relaxation, suggestions, visualisations, anchoring etc.)

  4. Emerging from hypnosis.

  5. Debriefing 

  6. Discussion of the self-help techniques to be used between the sessions.


Academic definition and approach

“The term hypnosis is used to denote an interaction between two people (or one person and a group) in which one of them, the hypnotist, by means of verbal communication, encourages the other, the subject or subjects, to focus their attention away from their immediate realities and concerns and on inner experiences such as thoughts feelings and imagery. The hypnotist further attempts to create alterations in the subjects´ sensations, perceptions an, feelings, thoughts and behaviour by directing them to imagine various events or situations that, were they to occur in reality, would evoke the intended changes” (Heap & Aravind, 2002)

The more narrow concept of hypnosis contains two elements: the hypnotic state and suggestion (Heap, 1996). This distinction led to further academic research, but there is still no consensus on the narrow vs broad definition (Kirsch et al., 2011):

“There is a hypnotic state of consciousness that enables direct suggestions to produce non-veridical experiences. Following hypnotic inductions, some people have the experience that their state of consciousness has been altered, and this can occur even if the induction does not contain specific suggestions about the nature of the hypnotic state. However, this so-called trance state is an epiphenomenon. It is merely a response to a particular suggestion (i.e. the suggestion to enter hypnosis) and has no direct causal impact on the experience of other suggestions”.

“People respond to hypnosis in different ways. Some describe their experience as an altered state of consciousness. Others describe hypnosis as a normal state of focused attention, in which they feel very calm and relaxed. Regardless of how and to what degree they respond, most people describe the experience as very pleasant. Some people are very responsive to hypnotic suggestions and others are less responsive. A person´s ability to experience hypnotic suggestions can be inhibited by fears and concerns arising from some common misconceptions. Contrary to some depictions of hypnosis in books, movies or on television, people who have been hypnotized do not lose control over their behaviour. They typically remain aware of who they are and where they are, and unless amnesia has been specifically suggested, they usually remember what transpired during hypnosis. Hypnosis makes it easier for people to experience suggestions, but it does not force them to have these experiences”. (Kirsch, 1994)


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“Hypnosis is a FAST TRACK to changing habits”.

Christopher Green, the Singing Hypnotist

Hypnotherapy helped to “come up with some tools to stop being quite so petrified”.

Olivia Colman, CBE
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  • A typical session takes approximately 60 minutes
  • Please note that currently all therapy sessions are carried out remotely via Zoom (GMT)
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Based on:

Brugnoli, M.P., et. al. (2018). The role of clinical hypnosis and self-hypnosis to relief pain and anxiety in severe chronic diseases in palliative care: a 2-year long-term follow-up of treatment in a nonrandomized clinical trial. Ann Palliat Med., 2018 Jan, 7(1)

Daitch, C. (2018). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Mindfulness, and Hypnosis as Treatment Methods for Generalized Anxiety Disorder. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis Volume 61, Issue 1.

Gruzelier, J. H. (2002). A review of the impact of hypnosis, relaxation, guided imagery and individual differences on aspects of immunity and health. Stress, 5, 147-63.

Gruzelier, J. (2002). The role of Psychological intervention in modulating aspects of immune function in relation to health and wellbeing. International Review of Neurobiology, 52, 383-417.

Heap, M. (1996). The nature of hypnosis. The Psychologist, 9 (11), 498-501.

Heap, M., Aravind, K. (2002). Hartland’s medical and dental hypnosis (4th edition). London: Harcourt.

Holdevici, I., Craciun, B. (2013). Hypnosis in the Treatment of Patients with Anxiety Disorders. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 78, 471 – 475.

Kirsch, I. (1994). APA definition and description of hypnosis: Defining hypnosis for the public. Contemporary Hypnosis, 11, 142-143.

Kirsch I, et al. (2011). Definitions of Hypnosis and Hypnotizability and their Relation to Suggestion and Suggestibility: A Consensus Statement. Contemporary Hypnosis and integrative therapy 28(2), 107–115.

Michalopoulos, M.N. (2018). Mind/Body Healing: Hypnotherapy, Functional/Integrated Medicine, Epigenetics, Cancer & the Immune System. Journal of Heart Centered Therapies, Mar-22-2018.

Vasant, D. H., & Whorwell, P. J. (2019). Gut-focused hypnotherapy for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: Evidence-base, practical aspects, and the Manchester Protocol. Neurogastroenterology and motility : the official journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society31(8), e13573.

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